Monday, August 28, 2017

Digital Moments: M.Zuiko Digital ED 60mm f/2.8 Macro

M.Zuiko Digital ED 60mm 1:2.8 Macro 01
M.Zuiko Digital ED 60mm 1:2.8 Macro 02
M.Zuiko Digital ED 60mm 1:2.8 Macro 03
M.Zuiko Digital ED 60mm 1:2.8 Macro 04
Olympus E-P5, M.Zuiko Digital ED 60mm 1:2.8 Macro

M.Zuiko Digital ED 60mm f/2.8 Macro

M.Zuiko Digital ED 60mm 1:2.8 Macro
A close-up session with lenses begged or borrowed, fitted, or adapted (if it is a legacy manual focus lens), to my Olympus E-P5. I only have a very short session with the lens and the only possibility then was to zero in on one of the potted plants in the makeshift garden. As with the other quick take sessions, there was nothing technical about these shots, except that they were all taken wide open.

I suppose you can say that this is the beginning of understanding the characteristics of the lens. The images were shot in RAW, post-processed on Olympus Viewer 3 (OV3) with a touch or two of Google Nik Sharpener Pro 3 for the finishing touch.

M.Zuiko Digital ED 60mm 1:2.8 Macro 05

The Olympus M.Zuiko 60mm f/2.8 macro lens is fairly lightweight (weighs in at 185g), and has a fixed focal length the equivalent of a 120mm lens on a 35mm film camera. It is of dust-proof and splash-proof construction, and its design incorporates 13 elements in 10 groups and uses ED (Extra-low Dispersion), HR (High Refractive index) and E-HR (Extra-High Refractive index) glass.

This is an effort by Olympus to completely eliminate chromatic aberrations that can be found in other lenses. The design of the lens is further accentuated with the use of seven circular diaphragm blades that will surely help to increase the “bokeh” effect formed in the defocused areas of the image.

M.Zuiko Digital ED 60mm 1:2.8 Macro 06

The lens is also equipped with a high-speed Imager AF system. Imager AF is acquired by way of contrast detection and generally focuses on the subject nearest the lens. This lens is designed for everyday shooting with an emphasis on macro photography.

A small dial on the lens allows it to be operated in either traditional or macro mode. All said and done, this 60mm macro is easy and fun to use. Looking forward to another session soon.


Resource Links:
Macro Photography Tutorial
Macro Photography for Beginners - Part 1

Monday, August 21, 2017

Analog Diary: At The Ramadan Bazaar

Down At The Ramadan Bazaar 01
Down At The Ramadan Bazaar 02
Down At The Ramadan Bazaar 03
Olympus Trip 35

At The Ramadan Bazaar

Olympus Trip 35
'Street photography session at the Ramadan Bazaar with the Olympus Trip 35'

The annual Ramadan Bazaar, as always, is a hive of activity where throngs of buyers size up the delights for their break of fast and the sellers equally active hawking the aromas of local delicacies.

Feast your eyes on the spread, pick your flavor of the day, back again tomorrow for another selection, forget not that this will last for only a month, and savor your thought on what the new year will bring.

Down At The Ramadan Bazaar 04

This session was shot with the Olympus Trip 35, a fully-automatic viewfinder camera made from 1968 to 1983, made popular with promotions that incorporate an advertising campaign featuring renowned British photographer David Bailey.

The Trip 35 is a four-zone focus point and shoot model with a scintillating sharp D.Zuiko 40mm 1:2.8 lens, with a solar-powered selenium light meter that adjusts the aperture of the lens when the camera is set to its 'A' mode.

Down At The Ramadan Bazaar 05

Shutter speed on the Trip 35 is 1/200th second when the camera is set to the 'A' mode, and 1/40th second when set for manual or flash mode.

A red pop-up flag locks the shutter from being fired when the camera detects insufficient lighting for the 'A' mode to get a correct exposure for the framed view.

Down At The Ramadan Bazaar 06

Apart from the straightforward four-position zone focus system, and an ISO setting from 25–400 (for the later version with the black plastic shutter button), the snapshooter camera had no other photographic controls.

Olympus Trip 35, Film box

On bright and sunny days where the aperture on the camera tends to be at 1:8 or smaller, just set the zone focus to 'Group' and you will probably get all your shots in focus.


Resource Links:
How to Shoot Black and White Street Photography
Best of Black and White Street Photography on 500px - 500px ISO

Monday, August 14, 2017

Found Slides: The Idyllic Life

The Idyllic Life 01
The Idyllic Life 02
The Idyllic Life 03
The Idyllic Life 04
The Idyllic Life 05
Found slides

The Idyllic Life

Found Slides: The Idyllic Life
'Found slides, a throwback to life in the 60's, when life was easy, idle and free (at least for the kids)'

Another batch of found slides, 30+ years old, scanned and post-processed on Olympus Viewer 3 (OV3). Shots are the children of friends, neighbors, and part our own extended family. It was a good life back then, nay a worry in the world, youth was on your side, life was fun and easy, and carefree.

Given the chance to have one of your own, what would yours be? Will you be away from the hustle and bustle of the city life? Away from the daily grind of commuting to and from work? Where will you be? What will you be doing? Do you have any other responsibilities from being just yourself?

The Idyllic Life 06

Time to reminiscent? Click on the first image to start a slideshow and enjoy the view through the lightbox interface!


Resource Links:
Colour postcards show idyllic life in 19th century Japan
Posts about idyllic life on Ace and Demi Travel Stories

Monday, August 7, 2017

Digital Moments: Konica Hexanon AR 52mm f/1.8

Konica Hexanon AR 52mm f/1.8 01
Konica Hexanon AR 52mm f/1.8 02
Konica Hexanon AR 52mm f/1.8 03
Konica Hexanon AR 52mm f/1.8 04
Olympus Pen E-P5, Konica Hexanon 52mm f/1.8

Konica Hexanon AR 52mm 1:1.8

Olympus E-P5, Konica Hexanon AR 52mm f/1.8
The final of my three Quick Take sessions with Konica Hexanon AR lenses: Hexanon AR 40mm 1:1.8 pancake, Hexanon AR 50mm 1:1.8, and this post with images from Hexanon AR 52mm 1:1.8.

All images were shot wide open in RAW, post-processed on Olympus Viewer 3 (OV3) including a few which were given extensive cropping, and final sharpening was done with Sharpener Pro of Google NIK Collection.

Konica Hexanon AR 52mm f/1.8 05

The idea of the series was not to be overly critical or technical with image capture or the performance of each lens, but as a thought that manual focus legacy lenses, with appropriate adapter for different brands of cameras, may still have a place within the proliferation of the new breed of manual focus lenses designed and produced for current digital cameras.

Come to think about it, it could be more economical and advantageous really, with the cost of lens-to-body adapters being very low, that these manual focus lenses can be just as easily adapted to more than just one camera make.

Konica Hexanon AR 52mm f/1.8 06

The Konica Hexanons were the mainstay of the Auto-Reflex series SLRs first introduced in 1966. Of the three in this Quick Take series, the 52mm 1:1.8 was the earliest to be launched, and in my opinion, gives the mildest color rendition. Bokeh was good. The 40mm 1:1.8 pancake colors are sharp and contrasty, with equally good bokeh when compared the intermediate 50mm 1:1.8. Each has their own merits, all are very affordable, and one will surely get you excited.


Resource Links:
Quick Take: Konica Hexanon AR 40mm f/1.8
Quick Take: Konica Hexanon AR 50mm f/1.8

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