Monday, March 25, 2019

Analog Diary, Canon Autoboy Tele 6 in Half-Frame Mode

Analog Diary, Canon Autoboy Tele 6 in Half-Frame Mode 01

The 35mm AF Canon Autoboy Tele 6 is a camera of sorts actually. It does only come with a twin 35mm F3.5 60mm F5.6 lens, but the camera was also designed to take images in both full and half-frame modes as well.

Canon Autoboy Tele 6
While the lens switchover from 35mm to 60mm can be done anytime during a shoot, the selection of either going for full or half-frame is a per film roll setup.

The lever for the full/half-frame selection is located on the top left corner of the film run in the film box.

This means that you have to set the selector before the film is loaded, and the reverse can only be done after the film roll has been completely exposed and wound back into its canister.

Analog Diary, Canon Autoboy Tele 6 in Half-Frame Mode 02
Analog Diary, Canon Autoboy Tele 6 in Half-Frame Mode 03

The other oddity which I find rather amusing is the self-retracting lens mechanism of the Autoboy Tele 6 which pops the lens out of the camera body as you are taking the shot and retracts it back as the shot is taken.

Canon Autoboy Tele 6

As the photographer, you might think nothing of it, but as a spectator curious about your photography interest, the curiosity might turn into a wry smile and a giggle.

Analog Diary, Canon Autoboy Tele 6 in Half-Frame Mode 04
Analog Diary, Canon Autoboy Tele 6 in Half-Frame Mode 05

For this shoot, I had the camera loaded with a roll of expired Fuji Superia 200, completed the roll in half-frame, and had the negative scanned at 2400 dpi on the Canon CanoScan 9000F Mark II.

Though colors are concentrated I do find that the slightly faded, both lenses produce images within the same quality range, though they not as well defined as those shot on the full-frame Canon Autoboy 3, which is fitted with a single 38mm F2.8 lens.

On the same token, I could also say that images shot the fixed-focus half-frame Olympus Pen EF do look sharper and are better delineated.

Analog Diary, Canon Autoboy Tele 6 in Half-Frame Mode 06
Analog Diary, Canon Autoboy Tele 6 in Half-Frame Mode 07

The fun about using half-frame cameras, where you get double the number of shots per film role, is that you are encouraged to experiment with multiple frame shots which can be posted ad diptychs, triptychs, or multiple frames panoramas.

Analog Diary, Canon Autoboy Tele 6 in Half-Frame Mode 08
Analog Diary, Canon Autoboy Tele 6 in Half-Frame Mode 09

My unplanned try at this technique during this early session with the camera, was not very successful. Although I managed to get a small number of diptych pairs, others fell short. Looks like it is going to be another day for me!


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Monday, March 18, 2019

Digital Moments, E.Zuiko Auto-T 150mm F4

Digital Moments, E.Zuiko Auto-T 150mm F4 01
Digital Moments, E.Zuiko Auto-T 150mm F4 02
Digital Moments, E.Zuiko Auto-T 150mm F4 03
Digital Moments, E.Zuiko Auto-T 150mm F4 04
Digital Moments, E.Zuiko Auto-T 150mm F4 05

A fun post with the images shot on the E.Zuiko Auto-T 150mm F4 lens. I had the lens mounted on the Olympus E-P5, and instead of using a tripod, decided to do a handheld capture of a bright light point, which is actually a stationary satellite reflecting the light from the still hidden sun as the morning was drawing nearer.

Olympus PEN E-P5, E.Zuiko Auto-T 150mm F4
The wavering light was made by the movement of the camera, as the shutter speed for these shots were between 2.5 to 6 seconds.

You might be able to guess, from the third shot, that the sky above my location was also the airspace and flight path for airplanes arriving and departing from a nearby airport.

The fourth shot is not actually of the satellite or a plane passing, but of a safety beacon on a power pylon.

For a real photo session, you might get what you see in the final image, a pretty sharp image of an evening shot at the equivalent of a 300mm focal length lens on the 2z crop sensor Olympus Pen E-P5.

Olympus PEN E-P5, E.Zuiko Auto-T 150mm F4

Images were post-processed on Olympus Viewer 3 (OV3) and print sharpened on Google NIK Sharpener Pro3.


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Monday, March 11, 2019

Analog Diary, Fuji Work Record OP

Analog Diary, Fuji Work Record OP 01

Well, this one is a bit of a surprise, the Fuji Work Record OP, a ruggedly handsome autofocus camera with a pair of bull bars flanking a wide-angle 28mm F3.5 lens which is further protected by a 4mm thick coated optical glass, an enormous viewfinder that lets you see all, and a ruggedized and water-resistant design that lets you capture images up to the depth of 1 meter.

Fuji Work Record OP
Though not easily discerned, either detailed on auction listings or noted on camera info sheets and reviews, the Fuji Work Record came as a pair of siblings.

The Work Record 28, with its orange button trim, is the construction or site supervision orientated camera, while the Work Record OP, with its blue button trim, is targeted more towards the rough and tough outdoor leisure and recreational activities.

Analog Diary, Fuji Work Record OP 02
Analog Diary, Fuji Work Record OP 03

The Work Record OP, just as well, comes with the addition of panorama and quartz date features, and manual focusing mode which can be pre-set to 1, 1.5, 3 meters, and infinity focus. The panorama switch is located on the top plane to the left of the viewfinder hump and this will let you switch from full-frame to crop-frame panorama captures anytime during the shoot.

Analog Diary, Fuji Work Record OP 04
Analog Diary, Fuji Work Record OP 05

Other than that, the innards and other technical aspects of the two AF cameras are similar, including the Fujinon 28mm F3.5 lens, shutter speed range from 1/5 to 1/250 seconds, DX-coded film ISO range from 50 to 1600, and power from a pair of CR123A Lithium batteries.

Analog Diary, Fuji Work Record OP 06
Analog Diary, Fuji Work Record OP 07

The best thing about the Work Record OP is its simple and straightforward operation - just power it on, set the mode selection to the setting you want to shoot with, point, and shoot. Exposure and film winding are automatic, autofocusing is just as quiet, and the large design shutter release button lets you shoot even with gloves on.

Analog Diary, Fuji Work Record OP 08
Analog Diary, Fuji Work Record OP 09

With its good looks and weatherproof design, I do not see any reason why the Work Record OP should not do as well as a street-shooter, as I did here, or even taken for a stroll in the park.

Fuji Work Record OP

Location of the street walk here is in the vicinity of Kuala Lumpur's Chinatown, Jalan Petaling to be exact, and a walk back to the Central Market along Jalan Tan Cheng Lock.

Images posted are shot on a roll of expired Fuji Superia 200, post-processed on Olympus Viewer 3 (OV3), and print sharpened on Google NIK Sharpener Pro 3.


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Monday, March 4, 2019

Mobile Photography, Catching The Morning Sun

Mobile Photography, Catching The Morning Sun 01

Here I am, back again at my favorite stomping ground, Taman Bandaran Kelana Jaya, not because of anything else except that it is very close to where I am staying. A couple of minutes walk will take me to one of the side entrances and an hour or so later I would have finished the roll of film I was testing the camera with, or a couple of dozen images shot with a different test lens mounted on the digital.

Mobile Photography, Catching The Morning Sun 02

There is nothing grand or spectacular about this place either, but, depending on the time of day, or the day itself, there could be a large crowd watching or participating in a fishing tournament, an RC powerboat derby, kids enjoying the playground facilities, joggers, or just people doing the morning or evening exercise.

For photogs like me, being at the park with its three fairly large water containment areas, and a scattering of high rise developments adjacent and within the surrounding municipality, sunrises on a sunny day are the best time. You will have to get over your sleep deprivation, of course, and have worked out on a plan of what you want to do.

Mobile Photography, Catching The Morning Sun 03

Sunrises on a sunny day are one of the best times to do your scenic photography, where you will be shooting the rich, warm, early morning sunlight as it flows over the landscape. Colors of nature are intensified and equally spectacular shadows are there for the taking. It is one of the two periods within a day when the light is most ideal for capturing breathtaking images.

In terms of composition, one of my favorites is to go for a vantage point where you shoot towards the sun and backlight the subject or have the sun shining from an angle that will add sparkle to shiny surfaces, leaves with waterdrops or spider webs with moisture drips.

Mobile Photography, Catching The Morning Sun 04

Another advantage you might have by being in the park at sunrise is that there are still not many people around. Space is all yours, albeit the other early bird who has already set up deck-chair and a battery of fishing rods already cast as he sits with a pair of headphones over his ears as he watches the sun rising.

What will your camera be? To each his own. For me, it could be as simple as my newfound favorite camera phone which I have been using since late 2018, the candy-bar Nokia Asha 300 feature phone, a product of 2011.

I started using this phone for my mobile photography images late last year and has yet to succumb to the euphoria of realizing that the Nokia ASHA 300 is one of the better fixed-focus point-and-shoot camera phones to have around.

Though the sharp, crisp and clear images are only 2985x1980 bits (5MP) in resolution, they have worked tremendously well for me after a quick edit on Olympus Viewer 3 (OV3) and print sharpening on Google NIK Sharpener Pro3.

Mobile Photography, Catching The Morning Sun 05

It goes without saying that enjoying photography and the satisfaction of enjoying the fruits of your amateur endeavors is not about having the best and the most in cameras and equipment, but rather how well you address and plan for the creativity at hand.


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Monday, February 25, 2019

Analog Diary, An Outing With The Konica Z-up 28W

Analog Diary, An Outing With The Konica Z-up 28W 01

It was a bright and sunny mid-morning and the outing with the Konica Z-up 28W took off from the Masjid Jamek LRT station, along the bank of the Klang River down to the Masjid Jamek Lookout Point, across the bridge on Leboh Pasar Besar, up again along the opposite bank of the River of Life, a veer towards Dataran Merdeka up Jalan Raja to the junction of Jalan Tun Perak, and back again to the LRT station.

Analog Diary, An Outing With The Konica Z-up 28W 02
Analog Diary, An Outing With The Konica Z-up 28W 03

The outing was organized to be short, enough to finish the roll of expired Fujifilm Superia 200 I had loaded the camera with. Images, though showing a slight fade due to the age of the film, was sharp and the colors concentrated, which may be the choice for some film photographers. I had a portion of the images posted on the camera review page, while those posted here are converted to black-and-white.

Analog Diary, An Outing With The Konica Z-up 28W 04
Analog Diary, An Outing With The Konica Z-up 28W 05

By itself, the autofocus Konica Z-up 28W, though not truly a real compact, is nevertheless a fun camera to use. It is oversized for your pants pocket, will fit in your camera bag, of course, comes with a very useful 28-56mm F3.5~6.6 zoom lens which is protected by a built-in UV filter, a very quiet shutter, and is one the fastest autofocus that I have used recently.

Konica Z-up 28W
The zoom functions through a push button on the top panel of the camera, one push of the button and the lens zoom out, and at its end of it, zoom back in.

While exposure is automatic, I do not even have an idea on the shutter speed range or what the aperture range of the lens is.

Camera mode selection, for Auto Flash, Flash On, Flash Off, Self-Timer with Flash On, Infinity Focus with Flash Off, and Macro Mode with Flash On is via a Mode selector button and the setting is displayed on the LCD panel of the shutter release button cluster.

Analog Diary, An Outing With The Konica Z-up 28W 06
Analog Diary, An Outing With The Konica Z-up 28W 07

A nice feature of the camera is the Snap mode, which sets the camera to a focal length of 28mm a focal distance at 2.75 meters, and film advance to two frames per second. When the Snap mode is coupled with the Self-Timer with Flash On mode, the Z-up 28W will set the shutter off twice, first after a ten-second delay, and the next three seconds later.

Konica Z-up 28W

Regretfully, information on the Z-up 28W is a rarity on the Net, and its instruction manual is nowhere to be seen. A sad thought on a very exciting and fun to use 35mm film camera that may remain obscure and elusive to photography enthusiasts.

Analog Diary, An Outing With The Konica Z-up 28W 08
Analog Diary, An Outing With The Konica Z-up 28W 09
Analog Diary, An Outing With The Konica Z-up 28W 10

Images were post-processed on Olympus Viewer 3 (OV3), and final print sharpening was done on Google NIK Sharpener Pro3.


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Monday, February 18, 2019

Digital Moments, E.Zuiko Auto-T 100mm F3.5

Digital Moments, E.Zuiko Auto-T 100mm F3.5 01
Digital Moments, E.Zuiko Auto-T 100mm F3.5 02
Digital Moments, E.Zuiko Auto-T 100mm F3.5 03
Digital Moments, E.Zuiko Auto-T 100mm F3.5 04

Digital Moments, E.Zuiko Auto-T 100mm F3.5

'Malaysia Photography Blog - A quick outing with the manual focus Olympus F.Zuiko Auto-S 38mm F1.8 legacy lens mounted on the Olympus E-P5'


The E.Zuiko Auto-T 100mm F3.5, another lens from the series produced for the Olympus Pen F/FT Half-frame Camera System of the 1960's, is as an outstanding lens as portrayed on a series of web pages including an image series by kuuan on Flickr, a discussion of MFlenses, a showcase thread on Mu-43.com, and a discussion thread on Fuji-X forum.

Olympus E-P5, E.Zuiko Auto-T 100mm F3.5
My well-used and slightly battered copy of the E.Zuiko Auto-T 100mm F3.5 is, however, far from perfect. It has a thin layer of fungal infection across one of its inner elements, and although the aperture ring is soft and smooth, the focusing ring is rather stiff.

This makes using the lens on my Olympus Pen E-P5 a two-handed operation, making things rather slow and slightly awkward. Images too, unsharp with slightly low contrast, were not at their best.

A good copy of the lens, with clean and clear glass, and smooth rings will probably do you wonders.

At 100mm focal length, the lens will be the equivalent of a 200mm lens on the 2x crop-sensor Olympus E-P5, long enough to put the lens into the medium telephoto category, good for closed sports or action shorts. Bright ambient light should give you the shutter speed you need, recommended at 1/200 second minimum, to shoot with the lens handheld.

Olympus E-P5, E.Zuiko Auto-T 100mm F3.5

An advantage you have with these cute and compact Olympus Pen F/FT lenses is the need of a lens adapter which is very shallow. On the E-P5, the whole extension, including the lens hood is only 115mm long.

Note: Images were post-processed (and enhanced) on Olympus Viewer 3 (OV3) and print sharpened on Google NIK Sharpener Pro 3.


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