Monday, September 17, 2018

Mobile Photography: Adieu to the Nokia Lumia 720 #I




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Adieu to the Nokia Lumia 720 #I

'Mobile photography, Part #I of my Auld Lang Syne to my old and trustworthy Nokia Lumia 720'

This will be Part I of a three-part post where I say adieu to my old and trustworthy Nokia Lumia 720. It has been quite a while since I began using the consumer grade Nokia Lumia 720, about five years ago, and the phone is now showing severe sign of old age. The battery does not keep its charge for more than a few hours, the screen is cracked and is taped over with a couple of small camera LCD screen protectors.

The Nokia Lumia 720, together with its Windows Phone 8 OS, was arguably the slickest mobile phone system available then and was super-desirable. Though it came with only a decent display (low on the pixels), it does have a very competent 8MP rear camera that makes up for other shortcomings and was good enough for me to enjoy an archive of high-quality images.



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Creating High Contrast Black and White Photos With Your Smartphone

One of the most popular looks that many photographers showcase on the web is the high contrast black and white look.The growing popularity has to do with the fact that it obscures everything else in a scene to a certain point and forces people to focus on the most simple parts of the scene that they really want you to pay attention to.

A Beginner's Guide to Doing Black and White Photography

If you've never tried black and white photography before, you may be wondering what the appeal is. After all, isn't it a little like black and white television or silent movies - an anachronism in our modern, high-tech age? The answer is no, definitely not.

Monday, September 10, 2018

Mobile Photography: Rainy Days, Nokia Lumia 720




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Rainy Days, Nokia Lumia 720

'Stuck in the rain? Turn to your mobile phone, It could be fun, and it can also give a moment or two of relief and enlightenment'

It is not always good fun to be stuck in the rain, worse still if you are a photographer, as you have to figure out how to keep yourself and your equipment dry. It could be just as bad if you are caught driving in the rain or while waiting to pick someone up. Driving in the city, for example, traffic could be down to a crawl, going bumper to bumper, with no end in sight. Have a camera phone handy? Could be fun, and it can also give a moment or two of relief and enlightenment.

On these rainy days, and where you are at, external lighting will usually be flat, the surrounding mushy, muted and dreary. Water sprays and mist from moving vehicles adds to the misery. Look again, defocus your vision, absorb the environment as a whole, and you may soon realize that the jewel of the composition forming in front of your eyes is the raindrops that are falling on your windscreen...



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Making Pictures in the Rain from Nikon

There are perfectly good reasons why people don't like to take pictures when it's raining. It's messy; you have to work to keep yourself and your equipment dry. But, with a little planning and the right gear, it can be well worth the effort.

Tips From a Pro: Shoot in the Rain

"I love shooting in the rain," says Art Wolfe. "I find inclement weather brilliant to work in. When most people pack up and hide, I bundle up and go out." Preparing at the time of this interview for a whirlwind tour of Thailand, India, and Japan, the Seattle-based Wolfe is a tireless traveler, photo-workshop guru, and, of course, a preeminent nature photographer.

Monday, September 3, 2018

Analog Diary: In the Mall, Olympus XA1




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In the Mall, Olympus XA1

'Analog diary, in the mall with a handy and simple point-and-shoot 35mm full-frame film camera'

Taking along the Olympus XA1, the simplest of the XA Capsula cameras produced by Olympus from over three decades ago is as easy as grabbing one and slipping it into your shirt pocket or purse as you are on your way out of the door. The XA1, a full frame 35mm film camera, is complete with its own capsule cover that slides back to open up the lens when you ready for the action.

This true point-and-shoot camera is exceptionally easy to use and maintain, firstly as the electro-mechanical shutter system is powered by a selenium cell, the camera does not need a battery for its operation.

The fixed focus D.Zuiko 35mm F4 is, of course, focus free, and images are sharp from 1.5 meters onward, and the programmed shutter ranges from F4/1.30 second to F22/1.250 second automatically depending on the ambient lighting situation.

Would you rather carry around a film camera instead of relying only on your handphone? Images captured on film may come out better than digital images when shot in natural lighting, it has a higher dynamic range, and film grain is aesthetically pleasing. All said and done, when all photo images can always be enhanced with a little bit of sharpening, scanned film images can also be given the same treatment in your process workflow.



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Olympus XA1, All You Need To Know

How much do you know about the Olympus XA1 ? Not much, I assume. You might even be surprised to know that the model ever existed. Seems that the XA1 is the least acknowledged or known of the compact clamshell designed 35mm range/viewfinder film cameras made popular by Olympus in the 80's.

5 frames with an Olympus XA1 - By Howard Hurd - 35mmc

The Olympus XA1 is probably the simplest camera I own. Part of the iconic XA series, it has a fixed focus 35mm f4 lens and automatic battery-free exposure. There is only one setting to worry about - selecting with 100 or 400ISO for the film speed.

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