Monday, October 23, 2017

Analog Diary: A Touch of Impressionism

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Canon AE-1 Program, Canon FDn 50mm 1:1.8
A Touch Of Impressionism
Canon AE-1 Program, Canon FDn 50mm 1:1.8
I still had a few shots left in the roll of film that I use for the 'A Sampling Of Images' with the Canon AE-1 Program and Canon FDN 50mm 1:1.8 lens and took the opportunity to finish the roll with a handful of night shots. The camera was handheld and, of course, and all things expected to go wrong with the images are all there - washed out colors, camera shake, out of focus setting, and all that you want to relate to failed images.

Rather than letting the shots go to waste, I took the images and went for a doodle with the Tone Curve tool on the image and post-processing editor, Olympus Viewer 3. The result was an interesting modernist art effect close enough to what I understand as being part Impressionism. Of course, I might be wrong. Nevertheless, I did a few more and ended up with this weeks post.

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Introduced as a successor to the Canon AE-1 (1976), the Canon AE-1 Program (1981) is one of the most popular cameras of all time. The 35mm SLR saw the introduction of the Program AE mode, which enables both the shutter speed and aperture automatically by the camera with the metering is slightly biased towards the shutter speed setting.

The Canon FDn 50mm f/1.8 too has its own merits. It was the lightest, and the cheapest, of all Canon FD interchangeable lenses, and the only lens in the Canon FDn series that came with only the SC (Spectra Coating) coating as opposed to the others which came with SSC coating. Handling was superb and its solid reputation for stable picture quality and sharp, crisp pictures has always been acknowledged.


From Wikipedia: 'Impressionism is a 19th-century art movement characterized by relatively small, thin, yet visible brush strokes, open composition, emphasis on accurate depiction of light in its changing qualities (often accentuating the effects of the passage of time), ordinary subject matter, inclusion of movement as a crucial element of human perception and experience, and unusual visual angles. Impressionism originated with a group of Paris-based artists whose independent exhibitions brought them to prominence during the 1870s and 1880s.'


Resource Links:
Vincent's Life and Work - Van Gogh Museum
Van Gogh and the Seasons

Monday, October 16, 2017

Digital Moments: S Zuiko MC Auto-Zoom 35-70mm 1:4

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Olympus PEN E-P5, S Zuiko MC Auto-Zoom 35-70mm 1:4
S Zuiko Auto-Zoom 35-70mm 1:4
S Zuiko MC Auto-Zoom 35-70mm 1:4
Of the three manual focus short to medium zoom lenses that I have recently featured in these digital moments sessions, previously the Sigma Zoom-Gamma 21-35mm 1:3.5~4 and the Tamron SP 28-80mm 1:3.5~4.2 CF Macro, I find that the S Zuiko Auto-Zoom 35-70mm 1:4 that I am doing for this session is no slouch either.

Sharp as it comes, weighing in around the 380-gram mark, it is lighter than the Tamron SP, not as compact as the Sigma Zoom-Gamma, and does look rather bulky in its standard Olympus two-touch zoom design - clad in heavy ridged rubber for the zoom ring, and the standard diamond pattern focus ring.

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S Zuiko MC Auto-Zoom 35-70mm 1:4
The MC 1:4 version is actually one of four versions of 35-70mm zoom lenses that Olympus produced. The earliest version was a slightly bulkier but said to a sharper 35-70/3.6 model, this one does not carry the S designation. The second version, which was sold alongside the 35-70/3.6 is what this post is all about. It was the first model to carry the S designation, which is supposed to imply a 'Simplified' version, probably produced to compete directly with lower cost third party lenses which were also hitting the market then.

The third version is the 35-70/3.5~4.5, a very compact and desirable 35-70mm to carry around with for traveling and shooting on location. The final version is a 35-70/3.5-4.8 budget model which was sold as a package with the Cosina-built OM2000 SLR. Ultimately, however, if you are collecting and if you are going for overall optical performance, then the 35-70/3.6 is the one to go for ...

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Olympus PEN E-P5, S Zuiko MC Auto-Zoom 35-70mm 1:4
Images shown here are shot in the vicinity of the park near where I am staying, which is, more often than not, is becoming the location many of my quick take and analog diary images. Images were shot in RAW on the 2x crop sensor Olympus E-P5, meaning that the images are shot at focal lengths equivalent equal of 70, 100, and 140mm. Post-processing was done on Olympus Viewer 3 (OV3) and final print sharpening on Google NIK Sharpener Pro 3.

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The first four of the six images, which have been cropped to 16:9 image aspect, are actually upside down reflections shot of the water surface. The last two are 4:3 full crops. All shots are taken at f/5.6.



Resource Links:
Quick Take: Sigma Zoom-Gamma 21-35mm 1:3.5~4 Quick Take: Tamron SP 28-80mm 1:3.5~4.2 CF Macro

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